Labor & Employment - B Pramanik & Associates

The importance of labor & employment law in all employment-related matters

We all work for survival and the majority of individuals work for others as an employee rather than running their businesses, labor & employment law was created to defend employees' rights. It aids both the employee and the employer in resolving problems that arise at work.

This law covers several Acts that must be observed while employing someone.

  • Minimum Wages Act: Minimum Wages Act determines what the minimum payment is in your specific state or city. According to your position, skill, qualification, and industry. In accordance with all of these factors, an employer can choose their minimum wages.
  • Payment of Wages Act 1936: This act makes it clear that employers must pay employees' salaries by the 7th of each month. This law also clarifies what deductions are allowed based on your profile, so your employer can't take unnecessary deductions from your income.
  • Equal Remuneration Act 1976: According to this Act, it is unlawful to pay differently to men and women who have the same qualifications. Payment differences based on a person's gender, race, or caste are prohibited as per this Act.
  • Provident fund Act 1952: The provident fund declared that a basic 12 percent deduction from the base pay would be made for the provident fund and pension following retirement.
  • Employee State Insurance Act: This law clarifies the employer's medical insurance provided by the company along with any occupational accident insurance. This Act is applicable for the employees who are getting minimum 21000 rs per month.
  • Bonus Act 1965: According to this Act, statutory bonuses are required, therefore every employed person is qualified to receive one. The bonus's minimum range is. 8.33 percent of the employer's wage, with the possibility of going beyond depending on the business.
  • Gratuity Act 1972: According to the Gratuity Act, if you have worked for a particular company for more than 5 years, you are entitled to 15 days of gratuity every year.

Our expertise in the labor and employment law

B. Pramanik Association is knowledgeable about labor and employment law. When we came through a case we thoroughly research and verify each and every phrase that relates to employees and employers.

Every employee has a right under labor law since they work extremely hard and for a living. As a result, they should be informed of all the rights they are entitled to.

Our firm's main motive is to provide them with all these rights that they deserve and deprive of since long.

FAQs

Frequently Asked
Questions

What is the latest employee Act in India?

Indian Government is planning to set some new laws which will be affected from the 1st of July 2022. These changes are related to the working hours, weekly offs, Employees provident fund, in-hand salary, paid leaves, and gratuity

What is labor and employment law?

Labor and employment control schemes all laws that promote cooperation between employees for the benefit of both the employer and the employee.

How to apply for labor and employment issues?

You can file a complaint in your Hr (Human resources Team) as they are well aware of the policies of your company and your employment if you are not satisfied with the outcome you can case file legally against your company.

If I earn 15 thousand in a month am I applicable for all employment Acts?

Not exactly all but many of them are applicable in your case.

How to reach you?

This is our address and contact details:

Location: 158, Dumdum Road, Kolkata – 700074, West Bengal, India  (Beside Dumdum Ghoshpara State Bank E-Corner; Landmark – Dumdum Hanuman Mandir)

Phone: +91 9339055647

Email: info@bpramanikassociates.com

Website: www.bpramanikassociates.com

Are these Act applicable to all private firms?

Yes, these all acts are for a private firm as for government employees government has different rules and regulations

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